Curriculum

The International Baccalaureate curriculum serves as the cornerstone of the Academy's demanding academic program.

The International Academy is a an authorized IB World School for both the Middle Years and Diploma Programs.

The Middle Years Program (MYP) offers an integrated course of study focused on helping students in grades 9 and 10 to develop the skills and conceptual understanding necessary to make real-world connections across the curriculum. The IB MYP for grades 9 and 10 challenges students to integrate concepts through curriculum and personal development with:

  • classes and assessment in eight subject areas: English, Language B, Humanities, Science, Math, the Arts, Physical Education and Technology
  • the Personal Project in grade 10 that provides a framework for independent study in an areas of the students choosing focusing on the process of a long term project

The Diploma Program (DP) curriculum is made up of the DP core and six subject groups. 

Made up of the three required components, the DP core aims to broaden students’ educational experience and challenge them to apply their knowledge and skills.

The three core elements are:

  • Theory of knowledge,(TOK) in which students reflect on the nature of knowledge and on how we know what we claim to know.
  • The extended essay, (EE) which is an independent, self-directed piece of research, finishing with a 4,000-word paper.
  • Creativity, activity, service, (CAS) in which students complete a project related to those three concepts.

 
The IB Diploma and subject area certificates are widely accepted by universities and colleges around the world as evidence of superior achievement. It is the Academy's goal that every student receives an IB diploma and the benefits of a challenging liberal arts education. All students participate in the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme making the International Academy the only all IB public high school in North America.

Junior and senior students are officially recognized as IB candidates. During the two years of the program, they submit papers and projects to examiners around the world. In May of their junior or senior years, students sit for exams in each of the subject areas.

 

MYP Program

MYP icon

DP Program

DP Icon

Studies in Language and Literature (Language A)

Studies in Language and Literature (Language A)

Language Acquisition (Language B)

MYP Language B Honors Level I (French/Spanish/German)
(Y) Credit: 1.0
Course Numbers: 52101, 52301, or 52201
 
Prerequisite: None
 
Course Description:
 
This course is an introductory language program whose primary purpose is to start students on the path of becoming fluent in the world language, along with understanding and appreciating the cultures of the countries/regions where the language is spoken natively.  Students will learn to use the language in realistic contexts, concentrate on topics relevant to their own life and interests, and practice the essential points of grammar and pronunciation that will allow them to communicate effectively with a native speaker.

MYP Language B Culture (French/Spanish/German)-H
(S) Credit: 0.5
Course Numbers: 52103, 52303, or 52203
 
Prerequisite: Enrolled in Level I Language
Course Description:
This course will allow students to further explore the rich cultures of various countries/regions where the language is spoken natively. Along with enhancing their study of the world language, MYP Language B Culture challenges students to acquire an understanding of and appreciation for cultural differences.

MYP Language B Honors Level II (French/Spanish/German)
(Y) Credit: 1.0
Course Numbers: 52102, 52302, or 52202
 
Prerequisite: Level I or permission of instructor
Course Description:
 
This course is a language program whose purpose is to further the journey of becoming fluent in the world language along with understanding and appreciating the cultures of the countries/regions where the language is spoken natively. Students will learn to use the language in realistic contexts, concentrate on topics relevant to their own life and interests, and practice and fine tune the essential points of grammar and pronunciation that will allow them to communicate effectively with a native speaker.

DP Language I and II (French, German, Spanish)
 
(Y) Credits: 1.0 each year
Course Number: 52105, 52115; 52205, 52215; 52305, 52316;
 
Prerequisite: MYP Levels l & II 
Course Description:
 
The DP Language B course is a two-year course where students will continue their journey to becoming fluent in the world language, along with understanding and appreciating the cultures of the countries/regions where the language is spoken natively. Through analysis of authentic literature, the study of vocabulary and grammar will be studied in a cultural context that will assist in their preparation for future IB exams. All aspects of studying a language will be emphasized through writing, reading, speaking and listening. They will also use the language in realistic contexts, concentrate on topics relevant to their own life and interests, and practice the essential points of grammar and pronunciation that will allow them to communicate effectively with a native speaker.
 
DP Language Culture (French/Spanish/German)
(S) Credits: 0.5
Course Numbers: 52104, 52304, or 52204
 
Prerequisite: Enrolled in the first year of the IB Language B course
Course Description:
 
This course will allow students to further explore the rich cultures of various countries/regions where the language is spoken natively. Along with enhancing their study of the world language, IB Culture challenges students to acquire an understanding of and appreciation for cultural differences.
 

DP AB Initio Language Level I and II (French/Spanish/German)
(Grades 11 & 12)
(Y) Credit: 1.0 each year
Course Numbers: 52120, 52320, or 52220; 52130, 52340, or 52230
 
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: 
Level 1
This course will introduce the student to the rich cultures of the various regions and major cities of countries/regions where the language is spoken natively. Along with enhancing their study of the world language, this course challenges students to acquire an appreciation for cultural differences and the influence they have on our understanding of the ways in which people live and interact.
 
Prerequisite: Level 1

Level 2
This course is a language program whose purpose is to further students on the path of becoming fluent in the world language along with understanding and appreciating the cultures of the countries/regions where the language is spoken natively. They will learn to use the language in realistic contexts, concentrate on topics relevant to their own life and interests, and practice and fine tune the essential points of grammar and pronunciation that will allow them to communicate effectively with a native speaker.

Individuals and Societies (Humanities)

MYP Honors World Studies
(Grade 9, required)
(Y) Credit: 1.0
Course Number: 56100
 
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: 
This course provides a comprehensive historical survey of the world through the use of such tools as the Themes of Geography and Aspects of Culture. Students are introduced to many of the world's major cultures including the Middle East, Asia (with a focus on China and India), Africa and Europe in order to explore the condition of our world today. Both ancient and modern times will be examined as well as the development of social, political, cultural and economic systems in the context of geography and history. The content of the course requires extensive writing, research, presentations, debates and other creative and analytical expressions.

 
The curriculum of this course parallels with that of 9th grade World Literature, allowing students to examine the world's literary expression within a cultural, political, economic and social context. This provides an interdisciplinary humanities approach to both courses.

MYP Honors American Studies
(Grade 10, required)
(Y) Credits: 1.0
Course Number: 56300
 
Prerequisite: World Studies
Course Description:
 
This course covers aspects of American History from the end of the Civil War to 2001. This course will survey the past both chronologically and thematically. Themes that will serve as guiding questions include the defining and redefining of the meaning of liberty and freedom, changing views of the role of government, and America's evolving role in the world.
DP History I and II
(Grade 11, 12 required)
(Y) Credits: 1.0 each year
Course Numbers: 56401 and 56411
 
Prerequisite: MYP World & American Studies
Course Description:
 
The DP History program at the International Academy spans the 11th and 12th grades, and covers primarily 20th Century World History through 2000, with a concentration on Europe. There is no distinction between material covered by HL and SL students, except during the review period at the end of 12th grade. Due to the nature of the program, skills that are introduced in one unit continue to be emphasized for the balance of DP History, especially as regards IB preparation. The exact material covered and assessments may vary depending on instructor's choice and time available.

Microeconomics
(Grade 9, required)
(S) Credits: 0.5
Course Number: 56202
 
Prerequisite: None
Course Description:
 
This semester course is designed as an introduction to the structures, processes, and financing mechanisms of the marketplace, for both consumers and businesses. Students will learn personal budgeting, saving and investing, laws of supply and demand, productivity, competition and the roles of money and government in the free enterprise system. Practical applications include the "Living on your own" budgeting exercise, a (mock) $100,000 investing simulation, and the "Echo Pen" project, where students form companies and make decisions necessary to market a new product in a highly competitive industry.
DP I and II Economics
(Y) Credits: 1.0 each year
Course Numbers: 56205 and 56215
 
Prerequisite: Microeconomics
Course Description:
 
Following the DP curriculum, this two year course is designed to provide students with an advanced (1st - 2nd year university) level understanding of Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and International Economics, including a special emphasis on Economics of Developing Countries. Graphical analysis is integral to each area of study. Supplementing the DP curriculum, the course will include daily focus on current events with emphasis on implications for Federal Reserve monetary policy. Select students will compete yearly in the U.S. Federal Reserve's "Fed Challenge" as well as the NCEE's "Economics Challenge." Students may also become certified as Junior Achievement Consultants and teach economics to diverse elementary school students in local school districts. Time permitting, a short unit on Business Finance will also be offered.

Math

MYP Honors Integrated Mathematics 2
(Y) Credits: 1.0
Course Number: 53002
 
Prerequisite: Integrated Math 1 or an Algebra 1 course in grade 8
Course Description:
 
This is an integrated course. The student will study the algebraic concepts of quadratic equations and their graphs, linear systems, rational equations, complex numbers, and law of exponents. The geometric concepts which will be studied include similarity and congruency, proof, coordinate geometry, transformational geometry, and special right triangles. The statistics and probability concepts include sampling methods, simulation, histograms, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, and binomial distribution. The logical reasoning concepts include inductive and deductive reasoning, valid and invalid reasoning, negation, implication and equivalences. The discrete math concepts include matrix operations, transformation matrices, and counting techniques. Scientific and graphing calculators and computers will be used regularly throughout the course.

MYP Honors Integrated Mathematics 3
(Y) Credits: 1.0
Course Number: 53003
 
Prerequisite: Integrated Math 2 or a Geometry course in grade 8
Course Description:
 
This is an integrated course. Students will study a variety of algebraic, geometric, statistical and discrete mathematical concepts. These include, but are not limited to, inscribed figures, vectors, triangular and circular trigonometry, geometric proofs, logic, sequence and series, recursion, and polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions.
 
Prerequisite: Geometry and demonstration of mastery for both Algebra and Geometry on the IA placement test or the completion of MYP Hon Integrated Math II at the International Academy.
 

DP Math Studies (SL)
(Y) Credits: 1.0
Course Number: 53200 , 53205
 
Prerequisite: Integrated Math 2 or 3
Course Description:
 
This is a two-year course that concentrates on mathematics which can be applied to contexts related as far as possible to other curriculum subjects, to common general world occurrences and to topics that relate to home, work and leisure situations. Students will study the topics of numeration and algebra, sets and logic, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, functions, and financial mathematics. In addition students will study one of the following: matrices and graph theory, further statistics and probability, or introductory differential calculus.
IB Final Assessment:
External - 2 examinations lasting a total of 3 hours;
Internal - a project involving the collection and/or generation of data, and the analysis and evaluation of that data.

DP Mathematics SL
(Y) Credits: 1.0
Course Number: 53201, 53206
 
Prerequisite: Integrated Math 3 (minimum 84% on all tests) or permission of department.
Course Description:
 
This two-year course is designed to accommodate the student with a solid background in Integrated Math 3 and planning to pursue a math related field at the university. The compulsory core is comprised of studies in algebra, functions and equations, circular functions and trigonometry, vector geometry, statistics and probability, and calculus. Students will also study on of the following options: statistical methods, further calculus, or further geometry.
 
IB Final Assessment:
External - Two examinations totaling 3 hours;
Internal - a portfolio of five assignments representing the following three activities: mathematical investigation, extended closed-problem solving, and mathematical modeling.

DP Mathematics HL
(Y) Credits: 1.0
Course Number: 53202, 53207
 
Prerequisite: Math Methods in grade 10
Course Description:
 
This two-year course is usually studied by the student who is expecting to include mathematics as a major component of their university studies. The required advanced core topics are number and algebra, functions and equations, circular functions and trigonometry, vector geometry, matrices and transformations, statistics, probability, and calculus. Students will also study one of the following options: statistics, sets, relations and groups, discrete mathematics, analysis and approximation, and Euclidean geometry and conic sections.
 
IB Final Assessment:
External - Two examinations totaling 5 hours;
Internal - a portfolio of five assignments representing the following activities: mathematical investigation, extended closed-problem solving, mathematical modeling, and mathematical research.

 

Sciences

MYP Honors Biology 9
(Grade 9, required)
(Y) Credits: 1.0
Course Number: 55000
 
Prerequisite: None
 
Course Description: 
This one year course focuses on core concepts integral to understanding the biological sciences as well as developing skills in experimental laboratory work. The course is divided to address the following themes: Biology as a Science, the Organization of Living Things, Cellular Biology, Heredity, Evolution, and Ecology.  Students will design and execute their own laboratory investigations, analyze data sets, and reflect on the impacts of science in our society.  

 
MYP Honors Physics 10
(Grade 10, required)
(S) Credits: 1.0
Course Number: 55104
 
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: 

Physics provides a challenging conceptual science experience, emphasizing physical principles and laboratory experiments. Topics include measurement, the metric system, scientific method, Newton's Laws, kinematics, mechanical and electrical energy, electrostatics, electric circuits, and waves. The course will fulfill the requirements for the physics portions of the State of Michigan Common Core curriculum. The course will also prepare students to explore physics as an option in the IB science curriculum.

 

MYP Honors Chemistry 10
(Grade 10, required)
(Y) Credits: 1.0
Course Number: 55200
Prerequisite: Biology
Course Description:  
Chemistry provides a challenging conceptual science experience, emphasizing chemical principles and laboratory experiments. Topics include atomic structure, elements, the periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, electrons, compounds, and chemical reactions and equations. After successful completion of this course, students will be prepared for the scope and pace of IB Chemistry or a first-year college chemistry course. 
 

DP I and II Biology
(Grades 11, 12)
(Y) Credits: 1.0
Course Number: 55001 and 55002

Prerequisite: MYP Biology, MYP Chemistry, and Integrated Math 3

Course Description:    
This two year course explores concepts integral to the understanding of biological sciences and experimental laboratory work.  The course addresses the following themes:  Cellular Biology, Biochemistry, Heredity, Biotechnology, Evolution, Ecology, Botany, Human Anatomy, Physiology, Neurobiology, and Animal Behavior.  In addition, students will spend approximately 40 to 60 hours in the lab.  Students will also develop skills to design and execute their own investigation and will participate in an interdisciplinary project allowing for collaboration between students of all sciences.  This course prepares students to take either the HL or SL IB Biology Exam by the end of grade 12.

IB Final Assessment:

External - 3 examinations totaling 4 ½ hours;

Internal - an independently designed biological investigation

 

DP I and II Chemistry
(Y) Credits: 1.0 each year
Course Numbers: 55202 and 55205
Prerequisite: Physical Science, Chemistry, and Integrated Math 3
Course Description:   
This two-year course will prepare students for the IB Chemistry HL exam at the end of grade twelve. Topics covered in this course will include thermodynamics, stoichiometry, atomic theory, periodicity, bonding, states of matter, energetics, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, and organic chemistry. In addition students will do two additional options from the following: Human biochemistry, environmental chemistry, chemical industries, fuels and energy, modern analytical chemistry, and further organic chemistry. The course will include 60 hours of work in the laboratory. Students will use higher level thinking skills, problem solving skills and logic. Following the IB syllabus, chemical aspects of human reproduction and contraceptives may be covered.
 
IB Final Assessment:
External - 3 examinations totaling 4 ½ hours;
Internal - a portfolio of investigations
 
DP I and II Physics
(Y) Credits: 1.0 each year
Course Numbers: 55400 and 55405
Prerequisite:  MYP Honors Physics 10 and MYP Integrated Math 3 or permission of department
Course Description:   
This two-year course will investigate topics such as measurement, mechanics, thermal physics and properties of matter, waves, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics. Students will also learn two additional options from the following: biomedical physics, historical physics, astrophysics, special and general relativity, and optics. Much of physics is centered on conducting experiments and testing theories. Students will spend approximately 40 to 60 hours in the lab. In addition to extensive lab work, students will participate in a cooperative interdisciplinary research project that combines work in chemistry and biology with physics.
IB Final Assessments:
External - 3 examinations totaling 4 ½ hours;
Internal - A thorough and detailed independent laboratory investigation
 DP Environmental Systems and Societies
(Y) Credits: 1.0 each year
Prerequisite: Biology
Course Description:   
The prime intent of this one year course is to provide a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies; one that enables you to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that face our world.   You will examine your own relationship with the environment and the significance of choices and decisions that you make. The intent of this course is to allow you to evaluate the scientific, ethical and socio-political aspects of environmental issues. 
The course is divided into 8 Topics: Environmental Systems and Societies, Ecosystems, Biodiversity and Conservation, Water Systems, Soil Systems, The Atmosphere, Energy Usage and Climate Change, and Human Population and Resource Use.  

Theory of Knowledge

DP Theory of Knowledge I and II
(S) Credits: 0.5  each semester
Course Numbers: 56600 and 56601
Prerequisite: none  
Duration: 2 semesters
 

DP TOK 1
Course Description:
It is a commonplace to say that the world has experienced a digital revolution and that we are now part of a global information economy. The extent and impact of the changes signalled by such grand phrases vary greatly in different parts of the world, but their implications for knowledge are profound. Reflection on such huge cultural shifts is one part of what the TOK course is about. Its context is a world immeasurably different from that inhabited by "renaissance man". Knowledge may indeed be said to have exploded: it has not only expanded massively but also become increasingly specialized, or fragmented. At the same time, discoveries in the 20th century (quantum mechanics, chaos theory) have demonstrated that there are things that it is impossible for us to know or predict.
 
The TOK course, a flagship element in the Diploma Programme, encourages critical thinking about knowledge itself, to try to help young people make sense of what they encounter. Its core content is questions like these: What counts as knowledge? How does it grow? What are its limits? Who owns knowledge? What is the value of knowledge? What are the implications of having, or not having, knowledge?
 
What makes TOK unique, and distinctively different from standard academic disciplines, is its process. At the centre of the course is the student as knower. Students entering the Diploma Programme typically have 16 years of life experience and more than 10 years of formal education behind them. They have accumulated a vast amount of knowledge, beliefs and opinions from academic disciplines and their lives outside the classroom. In TOK they have the opportunity to step back from this relentless acquisition of new knowledge, in order to consider knowledge issues. These include the questions already mentioned, viewed from the perspective of the student, but often begin from more basic ones, like: What do I claim to know [about X]? Am I justified in doing so [how?]? Such questions may initially seem abstract or theoretical, but TOK teachers bring them into closer focus by taking into account their students' interests, circumstances and outlooks in planning the course.
 
TOK activities and discussions aim to help students discover and express their views on knowledge issues. The course encourages students to share ideas with others and to listen to and learn from what others think. In this process students' thinking and their understanding of knowledge as a human construction are shaped, enriched and deepened. Connections may be made between knowledge encountered in different Diploma Programme subjects, in CAS experience or in extended essay research; distinctions between different kinds of knowledge may be clarified.
 
Because the subject matter of the course is defined in terms of knowledge issues, there is no end to the valid questions that may arise in a TOK course. No teacher can be an expert in every field, and the sheer scope of the TOK course is daunting. Students also can be awed by the size of the questions they are considering. Both teachers and students need the confidence to go a little-not too far-outside their usual "comfort zones". Then, with a spirit of inquiry and exploration, they can begin to share the excitement of reflecting on knowledge.
 
DP TOK 2
Course Description:
It is a commonplace to say that the world has experienced a digital revolution and that we are now part of a global information economy. The extent and impact of the changes signalled by such grand phrases vary greatly in different parts of the world, but their implications for knowledge are profound. Reflection on such huge cultural shifts is one part of what the TOK course is about. Its context is a world immeasurably different from that inhabited by "renaissance man". Knowledge may indeed be said to have exploded: it has not only expanded massively but also become increasingly specialized, or fragmented. At the same time, discoveries in the 20th century (quantum mechanics, chaos theory) have demonstrated that there are things that it is impossible for us to know or predict.
 
The TOK course, a flagship element in the Diploma Programme, encourages critical thinking about knowledge itself, to try to help young people make sense of what they encounter. Its core content is questions like these: What counts as knowledge? How does it grow? What are its limits? Who owns knowledge? What is the value of knowledge? What are the implications of having, or not having, knowledge?
 
What makes TOK unique, and distinctively different from standard academic disciplines, is its process. At the centre of the course is the student as knower. Students entering the Diploma Programme typically have 16 years of life experience and more than 10 years of formal education behind them. They have accumulated a vast amount of knowledge, beliefs and opinions from academic disciplines and their lives outside the classroom. In TOK they have the opportunity to step back from this relentless acquisition of new knowledge, in order to consider knowledge issues. These include the questions already mentioned, viewed from the perspective of the student, but often begin from more basic ones, like: What do I claim to know [about X]? Am I justified in doing so [how?]? Such questions may initially seem abstract or theoretical, but TOK teachers bring them into closer focus by taking into account their students' interests, circumstances and outlooks in planning the course.
 
TOK activities and discussions aim to help students discover and express their views on knowledge issues. The course encourages students to share ideas with others and to listen to and learn from what others think. In this process students' thinking and their understanding of knowledge as a human construction are shaped, enriched and deepened. Connections may be made between knowledge encountered in different Diploma Programme subjects, in CAS experience or in extended essay research; distinctions between different kinds of knowledge may be clarified.
 
Because the subject matter of the course is defined in terms of knowledge issues, there is no end to the valid questions that may arise in a TOK course. No teacher can be an expert in every field, and the sheer scope of the TOK course is daunting. Students also can be awed by the size of the questions they are considering. Both teachers and students need the confidence to go a little-not too far-outside their usual "comfort zones". Then, with a spirit of inquiry and exploration, they can begin to share the excitement of reflecting on knowledge.

Fine Arts

International Academy
Visual Arts Department
Curriculum Overview


MYP Visual Arts Overview 
The International Academy is a full International Baccalaureate school, offering the Middle Years Programme to all students at grades 9 and 10 and the Diploma Programme at grades 11 and 12.  The IA develops international-mindedness through a student-centered curriculum while meeting the rigorous requirements of the International Baccalaureate.  The MYP courses are based on three fundamental concepts:  holistic learning, intercultural awareness, and communication.  With a learning environment that allows students to develop both intellectually and personally, all community members practice the characteristics outlined in the IB Learner Profile; they are challenged to be inquirers, knowledgeable, thinkers, communicators, principled, open-minded, caring, risk-takers, balanced, and reflective.  In all MYP courses, there are six interactive contexts through which content is taught.  These Global Contexts are the nature of the self and relationship to others; world as a connected whole; forms of expression; the interrelationship of the natural world, human societies and the built environment; developing a sustainable world; and orientation in time and place. Through these Global Contexts, students are able to make connections between the content they are learning, the connections between disciplines and the real world around them.


MYP Arts Course Aims and Objectives
The aims of the teaching and study of MYP arts (aligned with the State of Michigan art Education Standards) are for students to:

  • create and present art
  • develop skills specific to the discipline
  • engage in a process of creative exploration and (self-)discovery
  • make purposeful connections between investigation and practice
  • understand the relationship between art and its contexts
  • respond to and reflect on art
  • deepen their understanding of the world

MYP Visual Arts 1: Honors Introduction to World Art
In this pre-requisite course, students will use a variety of art materials to develop basic skills and learn techniques, with a focus on drawing, color theory and the elements of 2-D and 3-D design.  While creating art and learning art processes, the students will examine the role that art and artists have played in ancient world cultures.  Activities throughout the course will enable the student to articulate the meaning of a work of art.     Unit questions will guide student inquiry and connections will be made to other subject curricula.   This course is designed to challenge all skill levels.

MYP Visual Arts 2: Explorations in American Art
In this intermediate course, students will advance beyond the basics using specific media and skills in the areas of drawing, 2-D design, painting, 3-D design, and clay. Students will acquire a more sophisticated knowledge of the elements of art and principles of design, as well as cultural and historical aspects of American art.  Activities throughout the course will encourage the student to pursue the creative expression of thought while developing technical skills.  Unit questions will guide student inquiry and connections will be made to other subject curricula. 

DP Visual Arts 1
Course Overview: In this IB course, students will explore and develop art concepts and techniques in a broad range of stylistic approaches and media (2-D and 3-D), producing meaningful and creative works of art.  Their artistic production will be related to personal research that demonstrates in written and visual terms understanding and analysis of art from their own and other cultures.  During the course, students will develop a portfolio of artwork, art journals, and a process portfolio recording research, exploration, execution, and evaluation of all projects as related to their personal themes.  They will also develop IB Visual Arts external assessments: the Comparative Study and Process Portfolio.

DP Visual Arts 2
Course Overview: During year two, students will resume more independent exploration and development of art concepts and techniques in a broad range of stylistic approaches and media, continuing to produce meaningful, and creative works of art.  Artistic production will be integrated with personal research that demonstrates in written and visual terms understanding and analysis of art from their own and other cultures. During this year, students will continue to develop a studio portfolio and investigation workbooks started in IB Visual Arts 1.  The course will culminate in preparation for and completion of the IB exam: Comparative Study, Process Portfolio and Exhibition.

DP Visual Art 
Each course involves studio experiences in the following areas:

  • Drawing: pencil, ink, charcoal, pastels, color pencil
  • Painting: tempera, watercolor, acrylics
  • Printmaking
  • Mixed Media / Design
  • Crafts
  • Clay
  • Sculpture
  • Computer Graphics

 






 

 

Physical Education

MYP Physical Education

 

(Grade 9 required)

(S) Credits: 0.5

Course Number: 54101

 

Prerequisite: None

Course Description:

 

MYP physical education and health is taught as a combined curriculum in both 9th and 10th grades. The course makes use of non-traditional games, group initiatives and challenge ropes course activities to develop an appreciation of physical fitness, group skills such as leadership, communication and problem solving.

 

The curriculum also seeks to develop interpersonal skills such as goal setting, trusting, risk taking, and self assessment of both physical and emotional skills related to participation in groups. Physical fitness concepts such as cardiovascular endurance, strength and flexibility are also developed through both traditional instruction and as part of the adventure curriculum. The skills learned in Adventure Challenge are meant to develop a person's physical aptitude, appreciation for a physically active lifestyle and give them the interpersonal skills necessary to participate in any group setting as a productive member and leader.

 

The health curriculum has been designed to meet Michigan Merit Curriculum Credit Guidelines. The curriculum is composed of four main units: Nutrition and Wellness taught in 9th grade; Drugs & Addiction and Human Sexuality taught in 10th.

MYP Personal Project Product Team

MYP Personal Project Product Team


In the final year of the programme, each student completes a personal project, a significant piece of work that is the product of the student's own initiative and creativity.

Each project must reflect a personal understanding of the areas of interaction. Students apply the skills acquired through one of these areas as well as approaches to learning.

Students are expected to choose their project, which can take many forms, and take the process through to completion under the supervision of a teacher in the school. This involves:

planning
research
a high degree of personal reflection.
The personal project is assessed by teachers against a set of IB assessment criteria.

 

2019 Personal Project Exhibition

Pink Tax Project
Breathe Better Project
Anesthesia Website
Coloring Literature
Caring Drawing Project
Teaching Piano Project
Natural Remedies Project
History Project
Ukelele Project
Child Well Being project
Vietnam Memoir Book
Students testing PC
Building a gaming PC
Virtual Sandbox Project
Helping Hands Club Project
American Sign Language Project
Mental Health Project
Letters from our World Project
Sex Education Project
Decreasing Depression through Nature Project
photographing Detroit Project
Playing the Guitar
Autism Project
Save the Pollinators Project
Jewelry Project
Holistic Health
Towels and Terriers
Art Therapy
Knitted Kindness
Personal Project Board
Teaching Basketball
Cooking Project
Architecture of Detroit Website
Vegetarian Recipes
Songwriting Project Board
Bullying in Schools
Nutritional Guide for Teenagers
Tutoring Pontiac Students
Basketball Video
Prosthetic Arm Project
Novel Project
Lighthouse of Oakland county Project
Furniture Building Project
The future of chocolate
Animation Project
Designing a Video Game
Pangolin Project
Building a wood shed
personal health
Building a PC
CO2 Flow Cell Battery
DIY Hydroponics
Making Music
Cultural Foods
Domestic Violence
Early Detection Breast Cancer
Climate Change
Better Health
Carving Art into books
Drive Safe
Mental Health Treatment
Sexual Harassment
Nature and Stress
Aquaponics
untold truths
homeopathic dog treats
Helping an animal shelter
shovel guitar
Designing a bike trail
Poverty Awareness
Recycling Center
Dress design
Pollinator Habitat Restoration
Electromagnetic Train
Healthy Eating on a budget
becoming a doctor
Plastic Pollution
Diversity in Classical Music
Soap for Hope
Speak up Speak out
Personal and Cultural Expression
Attack Anxiety
Red Ribbon Art Mission
opening the closet door
Re-use and Return
Dungeons and Dragons Campaign
Escape Room
Hunger Solutions
Helping the East
Toy Station
ib world school icon